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asking residents of boston to send in any video they had and would comb through it. martha raddatz, one of the interesting factors there was no specific threat coming in before the marathon. >> there were no specific threats whatsoever. it was just a beautiful day in boston. the boston marathon, of course, we had national guard there and a lot of police presence, but nothing indicating any sort of terrorist attack or any kind of attack. >> okay, we see the officials walking in right now. we know that governor deval patrick and mayor tom menino is there serving in his 20th year and joined by the police commissioner ed davis and fbi special agent in charge and several others including massachusetts senator elizabeth warren as they gather. we're hoping to learn more about it. >> act of terror yesterday, we wanted to organize a briefing with you and the information we have. the mayor is here. the members of our congressional delegation, all of the law enforcement leadership. we have several people who want to present to you this morning and take your questions. a couple points i want to men
, danger zone. our own martha raddatz on the hot border, eye to eye with the soldiers of nuclear north korea. the u.s. commander telling her his greatest fear tonight. >>> the teacher. an abc news exclusive. she hid her tiny, first-grade students from the shooter during the newtown massacre. tonight she talks to us about that class and their new mission. >> we can get through and come out on the other side. we can learn from this. we can be stronger. >>> pay what you weigh. the airline now charging passengers by the pound. will this fly? >>> and top of the world. nearly a decade of determination. tonight we take you to see the spectacular first view from the top of the new world trade center. >>> good evening. we begin with north korea, the strange and mysterious nation playing a dangerous game with the u.s. and much of the world tonight. north korea has raised the ante specifically on nuclear weapons, the u.s. secretary of state called the threat provocative and reckless. abc's martha raddatz is the only american reporter to make her way to the border with north korea today, to talk t
affairs correspondent martha raddatz is on the tense and watchful border once again in seoul, south korea. martha? >> reporter: good evening, diane. tonight officials tell abc news that it appears north korea is on the verge of testing a missile. exactly the kind of provocative act that can create a chain reaction here in an area that has not seen this much tension in years. tonight the u.s. is tracking a mobile missile launcher that has been moved within north korea by train. the launcher has the ability to strike japan as well as u.s. bases in okinawa and guam. adding to the fears, today, the young leader of the north said, "the moment of explosion is coming." >> reporter: north korea's newsreaders promising a justified all-out war.
to abc's martha raddatz. another of the questions we're focusing on is despite the celebration overnight, it's hard for anybody to rest easy until we get a sense of whether the suspects had ties to an international terrorist group that may still want to do us harm. abc's martha raddatz in washington this morning. how will investigators try to figure out if there is involvement from an outside, organized terror group? >> they'll work backwards. they want to look at the pattern of life. particularly the older brother, who they really are focusing on. the older brother, tamerlan, was in russia last year for six months. we have no idea why he was there. they're suspicious about what he w -- why he was there. did he get training, guidance, financing for a terror attack? investigators do, and the national security intelligence establishme menment in the unit states is go back and see if they missed any signs. we have been told again and again there was no so-called chatter. they didn't hear anybody talking about a potential attack. they didn't think an attack was imminent or possible at the bo
hitt. thank you. she mentioned friday night's dramatic events. abc's martha raddatz has spoken to the police chief of watertown, massachusetts, where the manhunt came to an end. >> reporter: the video images show the dramatic end to the manhunt, more clearly than anything we have seen. the police helicopter hovers in the darkness, holding steady, the natural heat from the suspect's body making a near perfect outline through thermal imaging despite the tarp that covers him. he is lying on his back, his head to the right, feet to the left. then a flash. a bang. police toss a stun grenade meant to confuse the suspect. then another. followed by a third. and then, watch, at first motionless, we see for the fst time, video as the 19-year-old raises his head, his upper body. >> he is moving. flailing about. quite a bit of movement. >> reporter: on the ground, dozens of negotiators watching from the second floor of the house nearby urging the suspect to give up. a robot moves in to peel away the tarp. >> successfully lift that off. he will be exposed. >> reporter: dzhokhar tsarnaev has
plotters out there. >> again, martha raddatz, we know his older brother had gone back to russia. we have a kind of dark age in there for a few moments when he was back in russia. we have no idea where he went. >> reporter: we have no idea. he was there six months. so, that's a period they're really going to look at and if they can interrogate this suspect, they will do that, the younger brother. they will ask him whatever they can find out from him, if he's in good enough shape to answer those questions. i think it shows unbelievable discipline tonight that they did not fire back. that volley of fire we heard, apparently was just coming from the suspect. and they did not fire back. that's -- we were talking about that earlier, diane, that tactical patience. they didn't have to fire back. they wanted that suspect alive and they just waited, cordoned off that area, made sure he was going nowhere, sent in that robot with that camera. they were in no daungdanger at point. they could send in the robot and watch from that command center and that robot and see what the robot was saying. as of r
's chief global affairs correspondent martha raddatz is in seoul, south korea, for us this evening. martha? >> reporter: tonight, in north korea, it's volatile leader, kim jong-un, has given no indication he will stop his dangerous provocation, with the regime saying its nuclear weapons are "the nation's life," that would not be traded for "billions of dollars." this coming just 24 hours after kim declared a state of war with its neighbor here in south korea. in the capital, seoul, just 35 miles from the border with the north, there is a sense of unease. "i am in the military," says this young man. "i feel this personally." the threats have been coming almost every day and each day, become more menacing. the threat of missile strikes on the u.s. invading armies into south korea. and nuclear attacks. north korea has always made threats, but they are far more serious coming from a young, unpredictable leader. >> there's always that, even however small that may be, that a possibility of miscalculation. he's been making a lot of threats, brinksmanship and to follow that up, he does something,
very much. >> let's bring in abc's martha raddatz on the developing information about the suspects' international connections and what we're learning. martha, we believe these two men reported to be brothers are, in fact, from overseas as george mentioned probably from chechnya. tell us what we know at this point. what we've been able to confirm. >> well, i've been told they're either from chechnya or turkey is the way they're leaning at this point. yesterday it was made very clear to me that they were still intensely checking international connections. they said they had the whole of government trying to find out whether the suspects had other people who were helping them. now, in many ways as brad garrett pointed out it was a sophisticated attack. it was preplanned. on the other hand, they didn't underst understand that there would be surveillance cameras at the boston marathon. if they lived there several years certainly people would recognize them if those pictures got out. in that sense theree caution they may not be affiliated with another cell. they may have done this on the
on this massive chase all morning long. >> i want to go to abc's martha raddatz right now. we're learning all through the morning, martha, more and more about the background of these two suspects. these young men. one born in ky, rgyzstan, chechnya origins. >> george, they're looking for any connection and they have been looking for days for any sort of international connection even before they knew who the bombers were, who these suspects were, they are now coming through anything they possibly can, whether it's the internet, inspiration from somewhere overseas, they still don't know, they may have been operating on their own, radicalized on their own and had no help from overseas. we do not know that. one indication that pierre vee pamilitaryraining.eemed to they knew what they were doing this morning in that gun battle and knew how to handle those weapons and bombs. that may be from the internet. you can find out how to make a bomb on the internet, how to use a weapon on the internet and you can certainly get a weapon. most of all, how in the world did this happen? those descriptions of th
and clear danger to the united states. tonight abc's chief global affairs correspondent martha raddatz is once again, in south korea, showing us how the united states is gearing up to respond if north korea is really intent on war. >> reporter: tonight, the u.s. says it stands poised to respond. >> some of the actions they've taken over the last few weeks present a real and clear danger. >> reporter: at the border, we were there with the troops on high alert. then, there is the missile battery being sent to guam, and the two guided missile sdroirs -- destroyers, eyes and ears scanning for the very first moves by the north. and warplanes, including fighter jets, u-2 spy planes and a-10 attack jets in the skies today, part of a massive military exercise overseen by a u.s. lieutenant general who brought in f-22 stealth fighters as well. they'd be first into the north if war broke out. >> their super cruise capability, their stealth capability gives them the opportunity to go places no other aircraft can go. >> reporter: in the secretive north stands the largest special operations force in
. >>> i want to bring in martha raddatz, just back from south korea tonight. what's different about the untested leader from his father? and what's the real threat as we head into another week? >> i think the difference is he has had some real successes. he had a nuclear test that was successful. he had a long-range missile test that was successful. this is a 29-year-old who feels very emboldened at this point. going into this week, i think you might see in the week or the week after that, a mid-range missile test, possibly two missiles. the mobile missiles that we're trying to track in north korea. probably will launch them into the water. the fear is that south korea or japan will react to that provocation militarily. the u.s. is doing everything they can to say don't do it. >> in the meantime, martha, you heard bob report there, this young leader wants a call from president obama. this is not how you get a call from the white house. >> that's not going to happen that way. one of my favorite stories while i was in south korea with the press, the korean press quoting dennis rodman,
that we want to show you. if we can pick up on the screen, i want to bring in martha raddatz. >> those are the pictures we've been talking about, george. >> tell us about them. >> that is tamerlan, the older brother who was killed by police. he is practicing boxing at the y it's the captions of these pictures that are really what stand out. here he is practicing and the photographers have each of the pictures and living in the united states for five years, tamerlan says i don't have a single american friend. i don't understand that. >> this young woman, he is in several photographs, we have no idea who she is. we have no idea whether it's the person he references as a girlfriend, so i do not want to identify that young woman as such, but in each picture he says he doesn't usually -- there's a picture -- there's one of the pictures where he does not have a shirt on. >> we'll show that one. >> tamerlan says -- >> yes. let's put that one back up. tamerlan says he doesn't usually take his shirt off so girls don't get bad ideas. i'm very religious. that is the caption under that specific pi
the white house? martha raddatz reports. >>> hail to the chief. five american presidents, five first ladies. an emotional george w. bush at his new library. and bill clinton on mr. bush's paintings. >> those bathroom sketches were wonderful -- [ laughter ] >> and tonight diane sawyer and laura bush behind the scenes. the moment that changed it all. >>> and subway surprise. the famous singer about to stun those passengers walking through that door with a performance. you're about to see it too. ♪ >>> good evening on this thursday night. diane is on assignment. we begin with the new shock wave, what authorities believe those boston bombers were planning next. hoping to head to times square in new york. a live reminder tonight of one of the busiest tourists destinations in the world. nearly half a million people passing through the heart of new york every day. investigators say one move, one choice, might have derailed their own plan. that carjacked mercedes had little fuel in the tank. when they went to the gas station, the whole plan began to unravel. abc's chief investigative corresponden
, martha raddatz and brian ross working the story all night long joining us this morning and, josh, this image from "the boston globe" really captures it all, "marathon terror." >> all the more staggering considering the day, patriots' day, a day important to the whole of new england. day read in one story where this city becomes a village and think what happens in the village center, that town center torn apart. >> patriots' day, 117th running of the boston marathon. all of boston coming out to celebrate even a game at fenway yesterday afternoon but look at the terror and chaos after those bombs hit. we have brand-new video coming in right now. people trapped between the two he can explosions exactly 12 seconds apart. watch and listen. this is what it felt like if you were caught between the two bombs. >> holy [ muted ]. >> oh, my god. [ explosion ] >> and, josh, 12 seconds of terror and captured so clearly right there. came right before 3:00 p.m., about 2:50. that hour when the bulk of runners would cross the finish line. >> the average finish was 4:18. this happened at about the
in washington and i'm here with martha raddatz. we just heard from the press conference. only two explosive devices. we heard from the fbi special agent in charge, no additional threats at this time. so little chatter around the explosion. no intelligence coming in before the explosions. no claim of responsibility after. >> reporter: george, intelligence officials are perplexed that there has been no chatter. typically, terror organizations like to claim responsibility as the event is unfolding. one thing left unsaid at the press conference, i spoke to a senior official about just this morning. whoever did this got away. there's no specific threat. officials say they have to be mindful of that going forward. they're quite sconcerned about copy cats. this investigation is complicated. you heard the fbi official and the police officials say that the crime area extends 15 blocks in diameter. they've only been able to reduce to it 12 this morning. that tells you how complicated the situation is, george. >> that's right. the police commissioner said it's the most complex crime scene he's seen in
. this evening has syria crossed that line? the stunning new intelligence. what now from the white house? martha raddatz reports. >>> hail to the chief. five american presidents, five first ladies. an emotional george w. bush at his new library. and bill clinton on mr. bush's paintings. >> those bathroom sketches were wonderful -- [ laughter ] >> and tonight diane sawyer and laura bush behind the scenes. the moment that changed it all. >>> and subway surprise. the famous singer about to stun those passengers walking through that door with a performance. you're about to see it too. ♪
apprehended. surprising that we haven't seen more incidents like this before. we've heard from martha raddatz and others, putting together devices like this, is not that difficult. we've just learned from the boston police commissioner that the library fire doesn't appear to be related to the explosions near the finish line of the boston marathon. so that narrows the net somewhat. >> reporter: yes, i spoke to an official who said that's looking like some sort of fire that originated in the building and not necessarily tied to the other incidents. so we were getting indications behind the scenes that was separate and apart and maybe not a bomb. >> and picking up on something brad garrett said, we heard from that one eyewitness who said that he saw an explosion take place from a garbage can. there's a good chance that officials, as they go through all the information being gathered from the site, in the hours leading up to the attack, there's a good chance they might be able to capture who was in that area that might have put the devices near the finish line. >> reporter: one key thing, looking
decisions to combat the potential threat. abc's martha raddatz has more about north korea's president kim jong-un. >> reporter: he had a nuclear test that was successful, he had a long-range missile test that was successful. a 29-year-old who feels emboldened at this point. going into this week, i think you might see in the week or week after that, a mid range missile test possible two missiles those mobile missiles that were trying to track in north korea, probably launch them into the water. the fear is that south korea or japan will react to that provocation militarily. >> that was abc's martha raddatz. because of the ongoing tensions the u.s. top military commander in south korea has canceled a trip to washington this week. >>> the body of an american diplomat killed in afghanistan now being returned to the u.s. later today. abc's muhammad lila knew anne smedinghoff and reports. >> reporter: 25-year-old anne smedinghoff was killed by a suicide bomber while delivering school books to needy afghan children. >> i want to emphasize that anne was everything that was right about our foreign
. which leads us to abc's chief global affairs correspondent, martha raddatz. martha, thanks for coming in. we appreciate it. let's talk about the older brother's trip to russia. we know there are islamic militants in this part of russia, but do these people have any history of attacking america? >> not the chechens. they have no history of attacking the america. what investigators will want to find out is whether he went to some sort of training camp, some radical training camp that did have a beef with america. who funded him, if he had any sort of extra funding. did he learn how to build those bombs there, or did he build them on the internet? that's what they'll be looking at and they will interview everybody they possibly can to see where those dark months led. >> if they rule out some sort of foreign plot, and that's a big if at this point, it would make these two brothers, assuming they're proven to be guilty, it would make them lone wolves, which as i understand it, has been keeping up national security officials in the middle of the night for years now. >> yes, because if you have
heard from his classmate as well. >> we'll take that to martha raddatz, our chief global affairs correspondent right now, martha, we're learning more and more about the suspects as the morning goes on now. we do know they are of chechen origin, one of the brothers had been here, the one still on the loose for about 12 years, his older brother for about five years, significant, perhaps, that his father still lives in russia in one of the russian republics could reinforce the idea that perhaps the young men did go back at various times. >> reporter: yeah, that's a surprise that the father still lives in russia because when they left chechnya apparently they moved to kazakhstan and dagestan after that and the youngest was born in kazakhstan. i don't know whether the mother is here. we don't have that information that but i think what is so chilling is what the young woman told you a short time ago who knew him from high school, the younger suspect, that he was just a normal kid. in so many ways, that's the nightmare of law enforcement, someone just blending into society and all the
roundtable. chief global affairs correspondent martha raddatz, richard haass and the editor of "the new yorker" david remnick. senator, and the congressman, let me begin with you, whether the subject should be read his miranda rights or enemy cobah abouts. also, the fact that his travel back to his hometown, that was a muslim area, could have been radicalized -- >> that was his brother. >> that was his brother, though, that's correct. we're talking about the two of them together, as to what happened and why it happened. and i think, we got to keep that option open until we find out whether or not there was a connection to the terrorist organization. >> do you agree? >> i'll agree, there is no question. the public safety exception is that we should utilize and that we should get all of the information available to us. >> how long does that public safety exception hold? even though the guy is lying flat on his back in a hospital bed? >> obviously, there are some communications right now because he can't talk. obviously, we can do some other things. we still, i believe, have enough evidenc
nation. and tomorrow night abc's martha raddatz will be taking all of us to the front lines. she's in south korea tonight. and from north korea to another flash point, syria. the civil war now heading into its third year and one human rights group says march was the deadliest month since the war began. more than 6,000 people killed, including 291 women, 298 children. and tonight, abc news has obtained video of a little boy just trying to help people stay alive. and we want you to know, as you begin to watch this, it is hard to see some of these images but they're the daily reality for a courageous child. here's abc's alex marquardt. >> reporter: there are no white doctors' coats that fit mohammed asaf. just 12 years old, he's been working in this busy and bloody makeshift aleppo clinic, housed in a former shopping center, for four months. in the beginning, when i saw blood, i would shiver and be frightened, he says, but now, i see blood like water. the wounded, many of them children, lie wherever there's space, some screaming out in pain. victims of the relentless street fighting
all of it very seriously. abc's martha raddatz is there. >> reporter: it was the sharpest message yet, south korea's new president, park geun-hye, the first female president here instructing the military to respond strongly if north korea attacks. the rumblings of war, a test of the 61-year-old president only a month into her presidency. her father, the president of south korea in the 1970s, and her mother, were both assassinated. her mother's killer traced back to a north korean sympathizer. now park geun-hye, who studied to be an electrical engineer, must decide how to respond if the leader to her north, half her age, decides to strike just like his father did three years ago. launching a torpedo at the south korean navy ship. the torpedo which hit late in the night literally cut the ship in half. 46 sailors were killed, 58 survives. south korea had no military response. touring the ship today, south koreans hope next time their response will be different. >> translator: i believe that we should take all the measures that we can to block off the provocation said this woman. we shoul
affairs correspondent martha raddatz is also standing by tonight from washington. i want to go back to the big headline about north korea's nuclear capability. tell us more about what it really means. >> well, they've had three nuclear weapons tests. but what we're talking about tonight is the tricky part. it's miniaturizing a nuclear weapon and putting it on a ballistic missile. this is the first time we've heard an official assessment from the pentagon about this, saying that they had moderate confidence that north korea could do this. this is a big development. now, i should add that no other intelligence agency in the u.s. government has yet signed on to the dia assessment, but still quite a development. >> i want to be clear. there's no indication that the missiles we've been watching, the ones poised for the test are armed with any kind of nuclear material? >> absolutely. no indication of that right now, diane. but it is an indication that they built up missile defenses, that they want to build up missile defendanses in the u.s. because of this assessment, but nothing indicati
or not they were part of a larger group and there could be other plotters out there. >> again, martha raddatz, we know his older brother had gone back to russia. we have a kind of dark age in there for a few moments when he was back in russia. we have no idea where he went. >> reporter: we have no idea. he was there six months. so, that's a period they're really going to look at and if they can interrogate this suspect, they will do that, the younger brother. they will ask him whatever they
was hiding right before he was taken. martha raddatz has the story. >> reporter: the video images show the dramatic end to the manhunt more clearly than anything we have seen. the police helicopter hovers in the darkness, holding steady. the natural heat from the suspect's body, making a near-perfect outline through thermal imaging, despite t tarp that covers him. he is lying on his back. his head to the right, feet to the left. then, a flash, a bang. police toss a stun grenade, meant to confuse the suspect. then, another. followed by a third. and then, watch. at first, motionless. we see for the first time video as the 19-year-old raises his head, his upper body. >> quite a bit of movement. >> reporter: on the ground, dozens of negotiators watching from the second floor of a house nearby, urging the suspect to give up. a robot moves in to peel away the tarp. >> looks like he will successfully rip that off, he will be exposed. >> reporter: he has no place to hide. >> he was slow. and lethargic. what's in that boat? was it more explosive devices? >> reporter: moments later, he is on the
by the convictions they hold. gwen: covering this remarkable week, martha raddatz of abc news, james kitfield of "national journal." susan davis of "usa today." and dan balz of "the washington post." >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as it happens, live from our nation's capitol, this is "washington week with gwen ifill." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we went out and asked people a simple question. how old is the oldest person you've known? >> we gave people a sticker and had them show us. we learned a lot of us have known someone who lived well into their 90's and that's a great thing. but even though we're living longer, one thing that hasn't changed, the official retirement age. the question is, how do you make sure you have the money you need to enjoy all of these years? >> additional corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by boeing. additional funding is provided by the annenberg foundation, the corporation for public broadcasting and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. once again, live
. >>> but right to the alarming threats of war coming out of north korea this morning. abc's martha raddatz is there in seoul, south korea, where she's tracking the latest. good morning, martha. >> reporter: good morning,
.s. to take action. but is the evidence strong enough? a question for abc's martha raddatz, joining us, now, in washington with more. good morning to you, martha. >> reporter: good morning, josh. the language in this assessment is the strongest we have seen. and very specific. the white house saying, that the intelligence community believes that the syrian regime has used the nerve agent sarin on a small scale. that's an agent th paralyzes and suffocates its victim. but there are many caveats in the statement. they make clear that there's a varying degree of confidence that sarin was used. and basically want more tests to prove it. this seems a red line, josh, that still has shades of gray. >> this is something the president had been very clear about in the past. >> reporter: president obama did say, at one point, there would be enormous consequences if president assad used chemical weapons. but we're talking about the possibility of military action in syria or a no-fly zone. so, the administration is not rushing into this. josh? >> all right. martha raddatz, in washington. we thank you for
reactor that can make plutonium for bombs. martha raddatz is on the north korean border with america's top general there where tensions are high and soldiers are toe to toe. an abc news exclusive. >>> tragedy at one of america's top reality shows. "buckwild." the 21-year-old star of the breakout hit found dead behind the wheel of his truck. the vehicle partially submerged in mud. two people with him. his father speaking out about what might have led to their fatal accident. >>> and caught on camera. heidi klum races into danger, her 7-year-old son and nannies caught in a menacing riptide threatening to pull them under. her split-second daring rescue as supermodel turns supermom. >>> and good morning, america. robin off today. great to have amy robach here. we do have a lot to get to this morning including the latest on kevin ware. some good news. see him there walking on crutches. also speaking out for the first time about that freak accident on the court sunday. of course, he was playing for louisville in the ncaa and he is going to be back. >> great to see him on his feet. >>> also, asto
trigger an actual war and martha raddatz is live on the scene. >> two potential rivals for president, hillary clinton and joe biden both taking the stage. they were together last night for a public event. is this what the primary race in 2016 may look like? >> it's only 2013. >>> ballroom shocker last night on "dancing with the stars." wynonna judd and partner tony dovolani voted off. we'll talk to both of them this morning. >> all that coming up. >>> right to the headlines. josh, from north korea. >> going to go to the korean peninsula for the breaking news. it appears north korea is on the march toward war. an ominous new
. satellites tracking the roving rockets moving across the country. martha raddatz reports in moments. >>> feeling the heat, president obama raises eyebrows with surprising comments made at a fund-raiser about california's top prosecutor calling her the best-looking attorney general in the country. his opponents calling him sexist, both sides weighing in all night. >>> and breaking details on the incredible rescue of that second teenage hiker missing since sunday found with no shoes, barely breathing and severely dehydrated, clinging to a rocky space no bigger than a yoga mat rescued in the nick of time and helicoptered to safety. >>> and -- ♪ who can turn the world on with her smile ♪ >> a very special and emotional reunion this morning, the cast of the "the mary tyler moore show" turned the world on with their smiles and now they're back together for an exclusive interview, a part of our super reunion friday. >> get your hand off mary's knee. >> i'm sorry. ♪ don't need to fake it ♪ why don't you make it you're going to make it after all ♪ >> yes, we are singing it. i know
swarming for war? can president obama do anything to stop him? martha raddatz is just back from a tense border. >>> plus -- >> 88,000 jobs last month. >> it's a punch to the gut. i mean, it's not a good number. >> a grim jobs report. a new white house budget with cuts to social security and medicare. and a showdown on guns. >> you hear some of these goetz. >> he said personally i'll never try to ban any rifle gun and shotguns. now he's trying to ban all three. >> we'll tackle that with white house strategist dan pfeiffer and our powerhouse roundtable with george will, paul krugman of the "new york times" and greta van susteren of fox news. >>> hello, again. this week began with new threats of war from north korea. ended with president obama apologizing for a compliment. in between, he pushed his plans on the budget and guns. both uphill fights in congress. the white house adviser dan pfeiffer. let's begin with budget. it's going to come out on wednesday. it will include, for the first time, cuts to social security and medicare. already house speaker john boehner has dismissed them. and
to calm the situation and drew a line saying we will not accept north korea as a nuclear power. >> martha raddatz will be here to report on that and possible missile launch that could come any moment now. >>> the other big story this morning is that deadly and violent spring weather tearing through the south. our extreme weather team has been tracking it all. there is a new risk of more tornadoes right now. abc's ginger zee starts us off, and, boy, that is one huge tornado. >> and i've been traveling with that cold front across the nation, tornado watches active in the southeast, parts of virginia, mid-atlantic. lighting up this morning. through late morning watch for tornado potential. that's very, very important for this morning, but for the rest of the northeast, it's going to be mostly a rain event and heavy rain to start your weekend. not as bad as it gets up to new york city and boston. yesterday alone, 124 severe weather reports, one of them south and east of atlanta and that's where we find our rob nelson.
, and we will. >> the convention wraps up today. >>> coming up at 8:00 this morning on "this week" martha raddatz has an update on the tense situation between north and south korea. also congress returns this week to disappointing job numbers. a final showdown over guns, and a new budget proposal that includes cuts to social security and medicare for the first time. don't miss "this week" with george stephanopoulos coming up this morning at 8:00 right here on abc7. >>> new this morning, novato may switch electricity providers from pg&e to marin clean energy. on tuesday the novato city council will consider turning just about every other town in the county in switching providers. research shows switching away from pg&e would save the city $9,000 a year. when they looked at the costs last june, they found switching over would actually cost more. >>> also new this morning, a newly-founded san francisco nonprofit will hold a benefit concert called "sing for america" at the palace of fine arts tonight. it is to singers what a marathon is to runners. it's a chance to raise money doing what they
:00 this morning on "this week" martha raddatz has an update on the tense situation between north and south korea. also congress returns this week to disappointing job numbers. a final showdown over guns, and a new budget proposal that includes cuts to social security and medicare for the first time. don't miss "this week" with george stephanopoulos coming up this morning at 8:00 right here on abc7. >>> new this morning, novato may switch electricity providers from pg&e to marin clean energy. on tuesday the novato city council will consider turning -- joining nearly every other town in the county in switching providers. research shows switching away from pg&e would save the city $9,000 a year. when they looked at the costs last june, they found switching over would actually cost more. >>> also new this morning, a newly-founded san francisco nonprofit will hold a benefit concert called "sing for america" at the palace of fine arts tonight. it is to singers what a marathon is to runners. it's a chance to raise money doing what they love. last year's inaugural benefit concert raised more than $100,0
ruppersberger, jan schakowsky, along with jeffrey goldberg and martha raddatz. martha, let me begin with you and let's start with syria and this week, administration discovered some evidence of chemical weapons used in syria. describe the evidence. >> i think it sounds like pretty strong evidence. they got hair samples, tissue samples from some of the victims. they're at least 30 people died in aleppo alone that believe that's traced to the nerve agent sarin. they don't have the change of custody. they believe the assad regime is responsible for the deaths. but they don't know how yet to track that. we have people on the ground. the u.n. is not on the ground to trace that change of custody for proof. >> they say the evidence is not conclusive. that's why they need further investigation. several weeks. >> we have people on the ground, it dissipates quickly. it could take longer than that. >> mike rogers, you have looked at a lot of this evidence, is it conclusive for you? >> it is. we have classified evidence i think what we have strengthens the case. some amount of chemical weapons have been
their seats, take a look at martha raddatz on the north korean border with american commander james thurman. an unpredictable and inexperienced dictator. >> what do you think the likelihood is that kim jong-un will act against south korea? >> i don't think we know his true intentions. because he's kind of reckless right now. if they decided to resume hostilities, i think we got to be ready to go. if you ask every one of these soldiers out here tonight, it's about fighting tonight. and that's not a bumper sticker. we got to be able to do that. >> and martha joins us now. welcome back. along with george will, greta van susteren from fox news and david sanger of the "new york times". martha, let me begin with you. you're just back from north korea. we heard the general right there, said they're ready to respond, do they they'll have to? >> i don't think they want to respond. i think they're trying to talk south koreans out of responding if one of those missiles is launched and falls in the water. the biggest fear of the united states right now is that south korea will respond in some way, that
warship to the region and abc's martha raddatz is in seoul with the latest this morning. good morning to you, martha. >> reporter: good morning, josh. despite all those strong words from the united states, north korea continues to provoke. this morning, they blocked entrance to an industrial park shared with south korea, an industrial park that generates about $2 billion worth of revenue every year for north and south korea. in the meantime, the united states now has two missile-guided destroyers in the western pacific, and this is truly a standoff. josh? >> thank you, martha raddatz, in seoul. >>> meanwhile, the other breaking story overnight from texas where a possible new person of interest has now emerged in the case of the murdered district attorney. in the murder of mike mclelland and his wife gunned down in their home over the weekend. his assistant prosecutor murdered in january. well, now investigators are trying to figure out if a local official who lost his job after a corruption investigation may be tied to the killings. he reportedly threatened both prosecutors. a white s
their weapons program. abc's chief global affairs correspondent martha raddatz just returned from an exclusive tour of the north korean border with america's commanding general in the region. she joins us now. good morning, martha. >> reporter: good morning, george. there have been so many threats but this threat to restart the nuclear reactor adds a new and frightening dimension. we stood just yards from north korean soldiers along the demilitarized zone who were watching our every move, in what general james thurman described as a dangerous and volatile situation. when kim jong-un says threatens the united states with a nuclear attack you take that seriously. >> well, i think we should and i think we need to make sure that we look at all our vulnerabilities. >> reporter: but there is the more immediate threat, as well. >> stay ready. >> reporter: what is your greatest fear right now with kim jong-un? >> a miscalculation and an impulsive decision that causes a kinetic provocation. there's 14,000 tubes of artillery just across this line beyond that far mountain range over there. they have a lo
owned by the two countries. >> abc's martha raddatz spoke with the top military commander on the korean border. >> reporter: we stood just yards from north korea's red-hot border. >> right here -- >> reporter: its soldiers watching our every movein t buffer zone between north and south with more than a mlion the divide. >> there is another guard post. >> reporter: general james thurman is commander ofall forces here and his job to help protect america's allies, south korea and prevent war an increasingly difficult job with alarming threats coming from the north's new young leader. >> the situation is volatile. and it is dangerous. there is 14,000 tubes of artillery just across this line beyond that far mountain range over there. if they decided to, you know, resume hostilities. i think we got to be ready to go. >> reporter: and the threat of hostilities is far greater than artillery round. the north koreans so close to it along this shared border that they peered through windows as we spoke. now vowing to expand their nuclear capabilities, already believed to have enough material for mo
cleared to attack the u.s. with nuclear weapons. abc's chief global affairs correspondent martha raddatz is in south korea showing how the united states is gearing up to respond if there were an attack. >> reporter: the u.s. says it stands poised to respond. >> some of the actions they've taken over the last few weeks present a real and clear danger. >> reporter: at the border we were there with the troops on high alert. then there is the missile battery being sent to guam. and two guided missile destroyers, eyes and ears, scanning for the very first moves by the north. and war planes including fighter jets, u-2 spy planes, and a-10 attack jets, part of a massive military exercise overseen by a u.s. lieutenant general, who brought in f-22 stealth fighters as well. they would be first into the north if war broke out. >> they're super cruise capability, stealth capability, gives them that opportunity to go places no other aircraft can go. >> reporter: in the secretive north stands the largest special operations force in the world, the head of the spear, the world's fourth largest military.
-launchers capable of hitting guam is the latest provocation. abc's martha raddatz reports from seoul. >> reporter: the u.s. is tracking a mobile missile launcher that has been moved within north korea by train. the launcher has the ability to strike japan, as well as u.s. bases in okinawa and guam. adding to the fears the young leader of the north said the moment explosion is coming. north korea news readers, promising a justified all-out war. while here in south korea u.s. forces trained in hazmat suits. preparation in the unlikely event kim jong-un were to deploy his nation's arsenal of chemical weapons. one of the largest stockpiles in the world. but of the only attack so far, a hacker on north korea's flickr site. yes they have a flickr photo site. placing a snout on kim jong-un's face and mickey mouse on his chest. no one believes north korea will launch a nuclear or chemical attack. if there is damage from a missile launch either on purpose or by mistake, there will no doubt be a response. martha raddatz, abc news, seoul. >>> the unfortunate thing here, we just don't know too much about the
solid and, if so, is it enough for the u.s. to take action. here's abc's martha raddatz. >> reporter: it is a stunning assessment. american intelligence now believing that the syrian regime has used chemical weapons on a small scale on its own people. >> they have a reasonable amount of confidence that some amount of chemical weapons was used. >> reporter: specifically, saran, the nerve ache agent suspected in an attack in march leaving 30 dead. it acts in seconds causing convulsions and paralysis that suffocates its victims. president obama hasn't wanted to embroil america in another war, but warned the regime if it ever used chemical weapons that could change. >> i have made clear that the use of chemical weapons is a game changer. >> reporter: on capitol hill, the call for action was swift. >> i think it's pretty obvious that red line has been crossed. >> reporter: the white house made clear despite the initial evidence they want certainty first. an investigation to establish credible and corroborated facts. as for military options, the u.s. could set up a no-fly zone stopping syr
us to abc's martha radda raddatz. been on the phone with sources today. just back from boston. so presumably they're looking at surveillance tapes in this area. what do you know about that? >> you heard brian say there's tons of video. they have surveillance everywhere in that area. it was the boston marathon. of course they had a lot of cameras out there. and you have social media, cellphone video. that's why they're asking for all this. the hard part here, though, is the more you have, the longer it takes to go through it. the more people you need to go through it. the more experts you need. and meanwhile, this bomber, this terrorist or terrorists are trying to get away. >> and other sense about how long this investigation could be going on and on? >> investigations in the past have had break. in the oklahoma city bombing they made a mistake and got caught in 90 minutes. the world trade center bombing, in 1993, they made a mistake, they caught those people very, very quickly. this one we're way beyond 24 hours and time is really critical in order to get someone. they may solve t
of war zones, abc's martha raddatz and, martha, so many lost parts of their legs and doctors have learned so much to help them straight out of the bionic man. >> it's true. hearing about these injuries was a reminder to so many and to me of the injuries our veterans have suffered but there is another reminder, the amazing progress we have made in treating them. when i first met mark little, bleeding and broken in the 28th combat support hospital in baghdad, he had lost both legs to a roadside bomb. >> you're pretty [ expletive ] certain. >> reporter: four years later he was newly married and also walking, running and even playing hockey with a set of prosthetic legs. >> i could see a soldier that came off the battlefield 72 hours and honestly say to him or her that six months from now their life was going to look so much better. >> reporter: for so many, the boston bombing victims recovery will be a long, hard road. but thanks to the painful experience of american troops over 12 years of war, that path is a more hopeful one. >> a decade ago i don't think we had anywhere near the ability t
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